30 Commonly Misused Words on a Internet

Technologically mediated communication has shabby a approach we write and speak. From acronyms to contractions, netspeak has done a approach into a dictionaries and is no longer singular to a amicable media. However, a infrequent opinion towards denunciation use is what leads to some critical gaffes online.

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20 New Tech Words You Should Know

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The many common language-related blunder people make on a internet is blending adult identical sounding difference with opposite meanings (known as homophones). There are several homophones that are ordinarily misused even by local speakers of a language. Following are some common examples of trip ups one can frequently mark online.

1. Aide vs. Aid

Aide means someone who offers assistance while aid means assistance.

Examples:

  • I didn’t accept any financial aide. (Wrong)
  • I didn’t accept any financial aid. (Right)

2. Ill vs. I’ll

Ill means unwell while I’ll is brief for I will.

Examples:

  • Ill be hosting a residence celebration this weekend. (Wrong)
  • I’ll be hosting a residence celebration this weekend. (Right)

3. Isle vs. Aisle

Isle is an island while aisle means narrow passage.

Examples:

  • The day we walked down a isle. (Wrong)
  • The day we walked down a aisle. (Right)

4. Band vs. Banned

Band means something that binds or a group while banned means prohibited.

Examples:

  • I was rope from entering a pub. (Wrong)
  • I was criminialized from entering a pub. (Right)

5. Your vs. You’re

Your means something that belongs to someone and you’re is brief for you are.

Examples:

  • Your kidding, right? (Wrong)
  • You’re kidding, right? (Right)

6. Lose vs. Loose

Lose means cease to have, or destroy to keep while loose means not fastened or contained.

Examples:

  • Did we lax your ring? (Wrong)
  • Did we remove your ring? (Right)

7. Desert vs. Dessert

Desert means dry land or abandons while dessert means after-dinner treat.

Examples:

  • Ice-cream is my favorite desert. (Wrong)
  • Ice-cream is my favorite dessert. (Right)

8. Duel vs. Dual

Duel means fight while dual means double.

Examples:

  • She was innate in India and lifted in a US. She has duel citizenship. (Wrong)
  • She was innate in India and lifted in a US. She has twin citizenship. (Right)

9. Discreet vs. Discrete

Discreet means tactful while discrete means different.

Examples:

  • His bureau has 3 watchful divisions. (Wrong)
  • His bureau has 3 dissimilar divisions. (Right)

10. Could of vs. Could have

Could of has no definition because it is an error while could have meant something that was expected though did not start in a past.

Examples:

  • You could of won a competition if we had participate. (Wrong)
  • You could have won a competition if we had participated. (Right)

11. Affect vs. Effect

Affect means to influence or impact while effect means the outcome of something.

Examples:

  • The impact of a hurricane was catastrophic. (Wrong)
  • The outcome of a hurricane was catastrophic. (Right)

12. 1 and 10 vs. 1 to10

1 and 10 meant any/ all numbers including 1 and 10 while 1 to 10 means any/ all numbers incompatible 1 and 10.

Examples:

  • How many numbers are there between 1 and 10? (Wrong)
  • How many numbers are there between 1 to10? (Right)

13. E.g. vs. I.e.

E.g. is “exempli gratia” in Latin that means example in English while i.e is “id est in Latin” means in other difference in English.

Examples:

  • I went to my slightest favorite place (e.g., a dentist). (Wrong)
  • I went to my slightest favorite place (i.e., a dentist). (Right)

14. Hear vs. Here

Hear means listen while here means this place.

Examples:

  • I here you. (Wrong)
  • I hear you. (Right)

15. Lessen vs. Lesson

Lessen means to decrease while lesson means example or section of instruction.

Examples:

  • Life taught him a good lessen. (Wrong)
  • Life taught him a good lesson. (Right)

16. No vs. Know

No means negative while know means be aware or understand.

Examples:

  • He doesn’t no her name. (Wrong)
  • He doesn’t know her name. (Right)

17. Flee vs. Flea

Flee means escape while flea means insect.

Examples:

  • I had to flea since we saw a cops. (Wrong)
  • I had to rush since we saw a cops. (Right)

18. It’s vs. Its

It’s is it is while its means belonging to or compared with.

Examples:

  • The puppy ran to it’s mother. (Wrong)
  • The puppy ran to a mother. (Right)

19. Miner vs. Minor

Miner means a chairman who works in a mine while minor is a chairman next authorised age.

Examples:

  • He can’t marry, he is still a miner. (Wrong)
  • He can’t marry, he is still a minor. (Right)

20. Capitol vs. Capital

Capitol is a building that belongs to a legislature and capital means money invested in a business or a many critical city.

Examples:

  • Austin is my favorite capitol city and Texas is my favorite state. (Wrong)
  • Austin is my favorite collateral city and Texas is my favorite state. (Right)

21. That vs. Which

That is to discuss something or used with limiting clauses while which is to elaborate on something or used with non-restrictive clauses.

Examples:

  • The automobile that strike me was blue. (Wrong)
  • The automobile that strike me was blue. (Right)

22. Too vs. To

Too means as good or excess while to is a preposition of transformation or direction.

Examples:

  • We are going too revisit her tomorrow. (Wrong)
  • We are going to revisit her tomorrow. (Right)

23. Then vs. Than

Then relates to time, sequence or condition while than is used to deliver comparison.

Examples:

  • She is taller afterwards me. (Wrong)
  • She is taller than me. (Right)

24. Wander vs. Wonder

Wander means to pierce about while wonder means to be curious, be in doubt, or awe.

Examples:

  • How we ramble what we are. (Wrong)
  • How we consternation what we are. (Right)

25. Stationary vs. Stationery

Stationary means still while stationery is writing and other bureau supplies.

Examples:

  • She pulled out a square of still and wrote a discerning letter. (Wrong)
  • She pulled out a square of stationery and wrote a discerning letter. (Right)

26. Sealing vs. Ceiling

Sealing means to bind or close securely while a ceiling is the overhead, top aspect of a lonesome space.

Examples:

  • I hatred portrayal a sealing. (Wrong)
  • I hatred portrayal a ceiling. (Right)

27. Alot vs. A lot

Alot is an blunder and it serve no meaning while a lot means plenty.

Examples:

  • That’s alot of sandwich! (Wrong)
  • That’s a lot of sandwich! (Right)

28. Weak vs. Week

Weak means frail while a week is a duration of 7 days.

Examples:

  • Let’s accommodate someday this weak. (Wrong)
  • Let’s accommodate someday this week. (Right)

29. Hippocrates vs. Hypocrites

Hippocrates means Greek physician while hypocrites are people who adopt something for a consequence of approval.

Examples:

  • You guys are all hippocrates. (Wrong)
  • You guys are all hypocrites. (Right)

30. Weather vs. Whether

Weather is an windy condition while whether means if.

Examples:

  • Let me know continue we like it, I’ll sequence a few more. (Wrong)
  • Let me know either we like it, I’ll sequence a few more. (Right)

Conclusion

Although there are remarkable advantages of simplifying language, one vital waste of regulating such denunciation is that it creeps into a grave (business, academic, etc.) essay too. One of my biggest pet peeves is my students slipping in acronyms like BTW (by a way) and ATM (at a moment) into their essays!

While mistakes are destined – from typos to slip and autocorrect blunder – one can always select to put in counsel efforts towards avoiding denunciation howlers by cranky checking what’s right and what’s not.

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